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J Neurogastroenterol Motil. 2018 Jan 30;24(1):58-69. doi: 10.5056/jnm17064.

Factors Determining the Inter-observer Variability and Diagnostic Accuracy of High-resolution Manometry for Esophageal Motility Disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.
4
Clinical Trial Center, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

Abstract

Background/Aims:

Although high-resolution manometry (HRM) has the advantage of visual intuitiveness, its diagnostic validity remains under debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of HRM for esophageal motility disorders.

Methods:

Six staff members and 8 trainees were recruited for the study. In total, 40 patients enrolled in manometry studies at 3 institutes were selected. Captured images of 10 representative swallows and a single swallow in analyzing mode in both high-resolution pressure topography (HRPT) and conventional line tracing formats were provided with calculated metrics.

Results:

Assessments of esophageal motility disorders showed fair agreement for HRPT and moderate agreement for conventional line tracing (κ = 0.40 and 0.58, respectively). With the HRPT format, the k value was higher in category A (esophagogastric junction [EGJ] relaxation abnormality) than in categories B (major body peristalsis abnormalities with intact EGJ relaxation) and C (minor body peristalsis abnormalities or normal body peristalsis with intact EGJ relaxation). The overall exact diagnostic accuracy for the HRPT format was 58.8% and rater's position was an independent factor for exact diagnostic accuracy. The diagnostic accuracy for major disorders was 63.4% with the HRPT format. The frequency of major discrepancies was higher for category B disorders than for category A disorders (38.4% vs 15.4%; P < 0.001).

Conclusions:

The interpreter's experience significantly affected the exact diagnostic accuracy of HRM for esophageal motility disorders. The diagnostic accuracy for major disorders was higher for achalasia than distal esophageal spasm and jackhammer esophagus.

KEYWORDS:

Diagnosis; Esophageal motility disorders; Manometry; Observer variability

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