Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Res. 2018 Apr;162:119-126. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2017.12.016. Epub 2017 Dec 29.

Short-term particulate matter exposure influences nasal microbiota in a population of healthy subjects.

Author information

1
EPIGET LAB, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: jacopo.mariani@unimi.it.
2
EPIGET LAB, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.
3
Department of Science and High Technology, University of Insubria, Como, Italy.
4
EPIGET LAB, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
5
EPIGET LAB, Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: valentina.bollati@unimi.it.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exposure to air pollutants, such as particulate matter (PM), represents a growing health problem. The aim of our study was to investigate whether PM could induce a dysbiosis in the nasal microbiota in terms of α-diversity and taxonomic composition.

METHODS:

We investigated structure and characteristics of the microbiota of 40 healthy subjects through metabarcoding analysis of the V3-V4 regions of the 16s rRNA gene. Exposure to PM10 and PM2.5 was assessed with a personal sampler worn for 24h before sample collection (Day -1) and with measurements from monitoring stations (from Day -2 to Day -7).

RESULTS:

We found an inverse association between PM10 and PM2.5 levels of the 3rd day preceding sampling (Day -3) and α-diversity indices (Chao1, Shannon and PD_whole_tree). Day -3 PM was inversely associated also with the majority of analyzed taxa, except for Moraxella, which showed a positive association. In addition, subjects showed different structural profiles identifying two groups: one characterized by an even community and another widely dominated by the Moraxella genus.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings support the role of PM exposure in influencing microbiota and altering the normal homeostasis within the bacterial community. Whether these alterations could have a role in disease development and/or exacerbation needs further research.

KEYWORDS:

16S rRNA gene; Air pollution; Microbiota; Particulate matter

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center