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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2018 Jan;104:182-185. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.11.018. Epub 2017 Nov 23.

Demonstration of analgesic effect of intranasal ketamine and intranasal fentanyl for postoperative pain after pediatric tonsillectomy.

Author information

1
Bezmialem Vakif University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Fatih, Istanbul, Turkey. Electronic address: alperyenigun@gmail.com.
2
Bezmialem Vakif University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Fatih, Istanbul, Turkey.
3
Bezmialem Vakif University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Fatih, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Tonsillectomy is one of the oldest and most commonly performed surgical procedure in otolaryngology. Postoperative pain management is still an unsolved problem. In this study, our aim is to demonstrate the efficacy of intranasal ketamine and intranasal fentanyl for postoperative pain relief after tonsillectomy in children.

MATERIAL AND METHOD:

This randomized-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the effects of intranasal ketamine and intranasal fentanyl in children undergoing tonsillectomy. Tonsillectomy performed in 63 children were randomized into three groups. Group I received: Intravenous paracetamol (10 mg/kg), Group II received intranasal ketamine (1.5 mg/kg ketamine), Group III received intranasal fentanyl (1.5 mcg/kg). The Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale (CHEOPS) and Wilson sedation scale scores were recorded at 15, 30, 60 min, 2 h, 6hr, 12 h and 24 h postoperatively. Patients were interviewed on the day after surgery to assess the postoperative pain, nightmares, hallucinations, nausea, vomiting and bleeding.

RESULTS:

Intranasal ketamine and intranasal fentanyl provided significantly stronger analgesic affects compared to intravenous paracetamol administration at postoperative 15, 30, 60 min and at 2, 6, 12 and 24 h in CHEOPS (p < 0.05). Sedative effects were observed in three patients in the intranasal ketamine administration group. No such sedative effect was seen in the groups that received intranasal fentanyl and intravenous paracetamol in Wilson Sedation Scale (p < 0.05). Cognitive impairment, constipation, nausea, vomiting and bleeding were not observed in any of the groups.

CONCLUSION:

This study showed that either intranasal ketamine and intranasal fentanyl were more effective than paracetamol for postoperative analgesia after pediatric tonsillectomy. Sedative effects were observed in three patients with the group of intranasal ketamine. There was no significant difference in the efficacy of IN Ketamine and IN Fentanyl for post-tonsillectomy pain.

KEYWORDS:

Analgesia; Fentanyl; Ketamine; Pain; Tonsillectomy

PMID:
29287863
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.11.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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