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Food Chem. 2018 Apr 15;245:595-602. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.10.132. Epub 2017 Nov 5.

Thermal processing effects on the IgE-reactivity of cashew and pistachio.

Author information

1
Department of Food Technology, National Institute of Agricultural, Food Research, and Technology (INIA), Ctra. La Coruña Km. 7.5, 28040 Madrid, Spain.
2
Department of Allergy, Research Institute Hospital 12 de Octubre (i+12), Avenida de Córdoba s/n, 28041 Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Genetics, Biology University, Complutense University, 28040 Madrid, Spain.
4
Department of Dermatology and Allergy, University of Bonn Medical Center, Sigmund-Freud-Str., 25, 53127 Bonn, Germany. Electronic address: Beatriz.Cabanillas@ukbonn.de.
5
Department of Dermatology and Allergy, University of Bonn Medical Center, Sigmund-Freud-Str., 25, 53127 Bonn, Germany.

Abstract

Thermal processing can modify the structure and function of food proteins and may alter their allergenicity. This work aimed to elucidate the influence of moist thermal treatments on the IgE-reactivity of cashew and pistachio. IgE-western blot and IgE-ELISA were complemented by Skin Prick Testing (SPT) and mediator release assay to determine the IgE cross-linking capability of treated and untreated samples. Moist thermal processing diminished the IgE-binding properties of both nuts, especially after heat/pressure treatment. The wheal size in SPT was importantly reduced after application of thermally-treated samples. For cashew, heat/pressure treated-samples still retain some capacity to cross-link IgE and degranulate basophils, however, this capacity was diminished when compared with untreated cashew. For pistachio, the degranulation of basophils after challenge with the harshest heat/pressure treatment was highly decreased. Boiling produced more variable results, however this treatment applied to both nuts for 60 min, led to an important decrease of basophil degranulation.

KEYWORDS:

Cashew allergy; Mediator release assays; Pistachio allergy; Thermal treatments; Tree nut allergy

PMID:
29287414
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.10.132
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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