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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2018 Feb;72(2):297-300. doi: 10.1038/s41430-017-0069-7. Epub 2017 Dec 28.

Polyphenol-rich curry made with mixed spices and vegetables increases postprandial plasma GLP-1 concentration in a dose-dependent manner.

Author information

1
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR), 30 Medical Drive, Singapore, 117609, Singapore.
2
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (SICS), Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR), 30 Medical Drive, Singapore, 117609, Singapore. jeya_henry@sics.a-star.edu.sg.
3
Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore. jeya_henry@sics.a-star.edu.sg.

Abstract

Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in glucose homeostasis. Evidence is emerging that dietary bioactive phytochemicals such as polyphenols can increase GLP-1 concentration in vivo. Spices are rich in polyphenols and have oro-sensory properties, both of which can increase GLP-1 secretion. We therefore investigated the effects of mixed spices intake on postprandial GLP-1 concentration. Using a randomised, controlled, dose-response crossover trial in 20 young, healthy, Chinese men, volunteers were served white rice with 3 doses of curry made with mixed spices and vegetables. These test meals were isocaloric and macronutrient matched. Plasma total GLP-1 concentrations were measured before (baseline) and for up to 3 h after the consumption of test meals. We found a significant dose dependent increase in total AUC of plasma GLP-1 concentrations, adjusted for baseline, with increasing mixed spice doses [adjusted mean (±SEM) of 10568.3 ± 1267.9, 12391.8 ± 1333.94, and 13905.1 ± 1267.6 pg ml-1.min for Dose 0 Control, Dose 1 Curry and Dose 2 Curry respectively (p = 0.019)]. Consumption of polyphenol rich mixed spices and vegetables can therefore increase in vivo GLP-1 concentration.

PMID:
29284788
DOI:
10.1038/s41430-017-0069-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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