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BMC Cancer. 2017 Dec 28;17(1):901. doi: 10.1186/s12885-017-3728-0.

Common variants in glucuronidation enzymes and membrane transporters as potential risk factors for colorectal cancer: a case control study.

Author information

1
Oncology Department, CHU Limoges, Limoges, France.
2
UMR-1248, Inserm, CHU Limoges, Univ. Limoges, Limoges, France.
3
Clinical Investigation Centre, CHU Limoges, Limoges, France.
4
Hepato-gastro-enterology Department, University Hospital Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
5
Pharmaco-epidemiology unit, University Hospital Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
6
Oncology Department, University Hospital Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France.
7
Digestive Oncology Department, University Hospital Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
8
Clinical Investigation Centre, University Hospital Toulouse, Toulouse, France.
9
UMR-1248, Inserm, CHU Limoges, Univ. Limoges, Limoges, France. nicolas.picard@unilim.fr.
10
Service de Pharmacologie, Toxicologie et Pharmacovigilance, CHU Limoges, Bâtiment CBRS, 2 avenue Martin-Luther King, F-87042, Limoges, France. nicolas.picard@unilim.fr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Associations between polymorphisms of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) or efflux transporters (e.g., P-glycoprotein and MRP2) and different types of cancer have been described, whereas the role of influx transporters (e.g. OATP1B1 and OATP2B1) has been seldom explored. The GenColon study investigated potential associations between variant alleles of UGTs, efflux and influx transporters and CRC.

METHODS:

Three hundred CRC cases were matched with 300 controls for age, sex and enrolment site. Fifteen SNPs in UGT1A6-9, UGT2B7, ABCB1, ABCC2, SLCO1B1 and SLCO2B1 genes were characterized using Taqman® PCR. Using multivariate conditional logistic regression, we investigated the relationships between CRC and "environmental" risk factors (physical activity, housing and working areas, consumption of red meat, tobacco, alcohol); genetic polymorphisms, in the study population and in the subgroups with "environmental" risk factors.

RESULTS:

No significant association was observed for the analyzed SNPs (or haplotypes). However, an increased CRC risk was found in carriers of the UGT1A8 rs1042597-G variant allele (additive risk OR = 3.39[1.29-8.89], p = 0.02951) in the subgroup of meat-consumers (n = 84), and in carriers of the ABCB1 rs1045642-T (exon26) variant allele (additive risk; OR = 1.89[1.10-3.39], p = 0.0257) in the "never alcohol consumption subgroup" (n = 125). In addition, as previously reported, the following CRC risk factors were identified: absence of physical activity (OR = 6.35[3.70-10.9], p < 0.0001), living or working in rural or mix area (OR = 2.50[1.48-4.23], p = 0.0006 and OR = 2.99[1.63-5.48], p = 0.004, respectively) and tobacco exposure >30 years (3.37[1.63-6.96], p = 0.0010).

CONCLUSIONS:

Variant genotypes of influx transporters (OATP1B1 and 2B1) were not associated with CRC. This study confirmed the influence of lifestyle factors, but not the previously reported detrimental effect of SNPs in intestinal UGTs or efflux transporters, except for a UGT1A8 variant in subjects consuming meat and the exon 26 SNP of ABCB1 in the never alcohol consumption subgroup.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Registered in Direction Générale de la Santé the 1st July 2008 under the number DGS2008-0144.

KEYWORDS:

Colorectal cancer; Efflux transporters; OATP; Pharmacogenetics; UGT

PMID:
29282011
PMCID:
PMC5745594
DOI:
10.1186/s12885-017-3728-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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