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J Occup Environ Med. 2018 Apr;60(4):e166-e172. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001269.

Using Longitudinal Survey Data to Estimate Mental Health Related Transitions to a Disability Pension: Analysis of an Australian Household Panel Study.

Author information

1
Centre for Mental Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (Drs Schofield, Butterworth); Centre for Research in Ageing, Health, and Wellbeing, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra, Acton, Australia (Dr Kiely); Department of Mental Health and Suicide, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway (Dr Mykletun); Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway (Dr Mykletun); Centre for Research and Education in Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway (Dr Mykletun); Centre for Work and Mental health, Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø, Norway (Dr Mykletun); School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (Dr Harvey); Black Dog Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (Dr Harvey); and Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia (Dr Butterworth).

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined the association between mental ill-health and subsequent receipt of a disability pension in Australia, and assessed how the strength of the association varied in relation to the duration between mental health measurement and reported disability pension receipt.

METHODS:

Eight thousand four hundred seventy-four working-age adults not receiving a disability pension at baseline were followed for up to 11 years; 349 transitioned onto a disability pension. Discrete-time survival analysis considered baseline and time-varying (12-month lagged) measures of mental ill-health.

RESULTS:

Proximal measures of mental ill-health were more strongly associated with subsequent pension receipt than baseline measures (odds ratio: 6.6 vs 3.9) and accounted for a significantly greater proportion of pension transitions (35% vs 21%).

CONCLUSION:

Mental ill-health is an independent risk factor for disability pension receipt, and proximal circumstances better capture this association than mental health measured earlier.

PMID:
29280770
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0000000000001269
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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