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Cancer Epidemiol. 2018 Feb;52:83-90. doi: 10.1016/j.canep.2017.12.006. Epub 2018 Jan 4.

Temporal and geospatial trends of pediatric cancer incidence in Nebraska over a 24-year period.

Author information

1
College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States. Electronic address: evi.farazi@unmc.edu.
2
College of Public Health, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States.
3
Department of Health and Human Services, Lincoln, NE, United States.
4
Department of Geography and Geology, University of Nebraska-Omaha, Omaha, NE, United States.
5
Department of Pediatrics, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) revealed that the incidence of pediatric cancer in Nebraska exceeded the national average during 2009-2013. Further investigation could help understand these patterns.

METHODS:

This retrospective cohort study investigated pediatric cancer (0-19 years old) age adjusted incidence rates (AAR) in Nebraska using the Nebraska Cancer Registry. SEER AARs were also calculated as a proxy for pediatric cancer incidence in the United States (1990-2013) and compared to the Nebraska data. Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping was also used to display the spatial distribution of cancer in Nebraska at the county level. Finally, location-allocation analysis (LAA) was performed to identify a site for the placement of a medical center to best accommodate rural pediatric cancer cases.

RESULTS:

The AAR of pediatric cancers was 173.3 per 1,000,000 in Nebraska compared to 167.1 per 1,000,000 in SEER. The AAR for lymphoma was significantly higher in Nebraska (28.1 vs. 24.6 per 1,000,000; p = 0.009). For the 15-19 age group, the AAR for the 3 most common pediatric cancers were higher in Nebraska (p < 0.05). Twenty-three counties located >2 h driving distance to care facilities showed at least a 10% higher incidence than the overall state AAR. GIS mapping identified a second potential treatment site that would alleviate this geographic burden.

CONCLUSIONS:

Regional differences within Nebraska present a challenge for rural populations. Novel use of GIS mapping to highlight regional differences and identify solutions for access to care issues could be used by similar states.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Pediatric cancer; Rural

PMID:
29278840
DOI:
10.1016/j.canep.2017.12.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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