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Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2018 Apr;275(4):849-855. doi: 10.1007/s00405-017-4848-5. Epub 2017 Dec 23.

Oropharyngeal and tongue exercises (myofunctional therapy) for snoring: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, 1 Jarrett White Rd, Honolulu, HI, 96859, USA. drcamachoent@yahoo.com.
2
Sleep Medicine Division, Department of Psychiatry, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 450 Broadway, Redwood City, CA, 94063, USA.
3
Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, 1 Jarrett White Rd, Honolulu, HI, 96859, USA.
4
School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, 20814, USA.
5
UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, Santa Monica, CA, 90404, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Oropharyngeal and tongue exercises (myofunctional therapy) have been shown to improve obstructive sleep apnea. However, to our knowledge, a systematic review has not been performed for snoring. The study objective is to perform a systematic review, with a meta-analysis, dedicated to snoring outcomes after myofunctional therapy.

METHODS:

PubMed/MEDLINE and three other databases were searched through November 25, 2017. Two authors independently searched the literature. Eligibility (1) patients: children or adults with snoring, (2) intervention: oropharyngeal and/or tongue exercises, (3) comparison: pre and post-treatment data for snoring, (4) outcomes: snoring frequency and snoring intensity, (5) study design: publications of all study designs.

RESULTS:

A total of 483 articles were screened, 56 were downloaded in their full text form, and nine studies reported outcomes related to snoring. There were a total of 211 patients (all adults) in these studies. The snoring intensity was reduced by 51% in 80 patients from pre-therapy to post-therapy visual analog scale values of 8.2 ± 2.1 (95% CI 7.7, 8.7) to 4.0 ± 3.7 (95% CI 3.2, 4.8). Berlin questionnaire snoring intensity reduced by 36% in 34 patients from 2.5 ± 1.0 (95% CI 2.2, 2.8) to 1.6 ± 0.8 (95% CI 1.3, 1.9). Finally, time spent snoring during sleep was reduced by 31% in 60 patients from 26.3 ± 18.7% (95% CI 21.6, 31.0) to 18.1 ± 20.5% (95% CI 12.9, 23.3) of total sleep time.

CONCLUSIONS:

This systematic review demonstrated that myofunctional therapy has reduced snoring in adults based on both subjective questionnaires and objective sleep studies.

KEYWORDS:

Meta-analysis; Myofunctional therapy; Snoring; Systematic review

PMID:
29275425
DOI:
10.1007/s00405-017-4848-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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