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Enferm Infecc Microbiol Clin. 2018 Dec;36(10):633-639. doi: 10.1016/j.eimc.2017.11.016. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Dermatological manifestations in onchocerciasis: A retrospective study of 400 imported cases.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

1
Unidad de Medicina Tropical, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital La Paz-Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
2
Unidad de Aislamiento de Alto Nivel, Sección de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gómez Ulla, Madrid, Spain.
3
Microbiología, Hospital La Paz-Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
4
Servicio de Oftalmología, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Universidad complutense de Madrid, Spain.
5
Dermatología, Madrid, Spain.
6
Parasitología, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.
7
Laboratorio de Inmunología Parasitaria y Molecular, CIETUS, IBSAL, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.
8
Servicio de Medicina Interna, Sección de Enfermedades Infecciosas, CAUSA, IBSAL, CIETUS, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.
9
Laboratorio de Inmunología Parasitaria y Molecular, CIETUS, IBSAL, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. Electronic address: ama@usal.es.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Onchocerciasis is caused by Onchocerca volvulus and mainly leads to pruritus and skin and visual disorders, including blindness. Seventeen million people are infected in 38 countries; 31 of these are in sub-Saharan Africa, six in Latin America and one on the Arabian Peninsula. More than 99% of cases occur in sub-Saharan Africa where 120 million people are at risk of infection. Eye disorders have been well-documented; however, skin disorders have not been described accurately. The objective of our study was to describe the epidemiology, main skin manifestations and treatment of imported onchocerciasis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A retrospective study was thus conducted by analysing the main demographic, clinical and treatment data regarding a cohort of 400 patients attending a reference clinical unit over a 17-year period.

RESULTS:

Most patients were female (55%) with mean age 37.5±16.7 years. All the migrants came from sub-Saharan countries. The most frequently occurring dermatological symptom was pruritus. Ivermectin had been used as first-line therapy and adverse reactions had been described in 11 patients (3.2%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicate the fact that there should be a clinical suspicion of onchocerciasis regarding immigrants from endemic areas having skin lesions compatible with the disease's profile or asymptomatic patients having eosinophilia or unexplained high IgE. Moreover, skin snips from the buttocks region were very fruitful and treatment with ivermectin was seen to be safe. This is the largest case series regarding imported onchocerciasis described up to the present time.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical study; España; Estudio clínico; Immigrants; Imported onchocerciasis; Inmigrantes; Onchocerca volvulus; Oncocercosis importada; Spain

PMID:
29275076
DOI:
10.1016/j.eimc.2017.11.016

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