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J Dairy Sci. 2018 Mar;101(3):1943-1956. doi: 10.3168/jds.2017-13546. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Prevalence of Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, and pathogenic Escherichia coli in bulk tank milk and milk filters from US dairy operations in the National Animal Health Monitoring System Dairy 2014 study.

Author information

1
Environmental Microbial and Food Safety Laboratory, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 20705.
2
Center for Epidemiology and Animal Health, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Veterinary Services, Fort Collins, CO 80526.
3
Environmental Microbial and Food Safety Laboratory, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 20705. Electronic address: joann.vankessel@ars.usda.gov.

Abstract

The dairy farm environment is a well-documented reservoir for zoonotic pathogens such as Salmonella enterica, Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, and humans may be exposed to these pathogens via consumption of unpasteurized milk and dairy products. As part of the National Animal Health Monitoring System Dairy 2014 study, bulk tank milk (BTM, n = 234) and milk filters (n = 254) were collected from a total of 234 dairy operations in 17 major dairy states and analyzed for the presence of these pathogens. The invA gene was detected in samples from 18.5% of operations and Salmonella enterica was isolated from 18.0% of operations. Salmonella Dublin was detected in 0.7% of operations. Sixteen Salmonella serotypes were isolated, and the most common serotypes were Cerro, Montevideo, and Newport. Representative Salmonella isolates (n = 137) were tested against a panel of 14 antimicrobials. Most (85%) were pansusceptible; the remaining were resistant to 1 to 9 antimicrobials, and within the resistant strains the most common profile was resistance to ampicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin, cefoxitin, ceftiofur, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfisoxazole, and tetracycline. Listeria spp. were isolated from 19.9% of operations, and L. monocytogenes was isolated from 3.0% of operations. Serogroups 1/2a and 1/2b were the most common, followed by 4b and 4a. One or more E. coli virulence genes were detected in the BTM from 30.5% of operations and in the filters from 75.3% of operations. A combination of stx2, eaeA, and γ-tir genes was detected in the BTM from 0.5% of operations and in the filters from 6.6% of operations. The results of this study indicate an appreciable prevalence of bacterial pathogens in BTM and filters, including serovars known to infect humans.

KEYWORDS:

Listeria monocytogenes; Salmonella enterica; bulk tank milk; zoonotic

PMID:
29274964
DOI:
10.3168/jds.2017-13546
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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