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J Cancer Educ. 2017 Dec 22. doi: 10.1007/s13187-017-1313-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Individual Supervision to Enhance Reflexivity and the Practice of Patient-Centered Care: Experience at the Undergraduate Level.

Author information

1
Psychiatric Liaison Service, Lausanne University Hospital, Av. de Beaumont 23, Les Allières, 1011, Lausanne, Switzerland. alexandre.berney@chuv.ch.
2
Undergraduate Teaching Unit [Clinical Skills], Department of Psychiatry, Lausanne University Hospital and Lausanne University, Lausanne, Switzerland. alexandre.berney@chuv.ch.
3
Psychiatric Liaison Service, Lausanne University Hospital, Av. de Beaumont 23, Les Allières, 1011, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Abstract

This article reports on what is at work during individual supervision of medical students in the context of teaching breaking bad news (BBN). Surprisingly, there is a relative lack of research and report on the topic of supervision, even though it is regularly used in medical training. Building on our research and teaching experience on BBN at the undergraduate level, as well as interviews of supervisors, the following key elements have been identified: learning objectives (e.g., raising student awareness of structural elements of the interview, emotion (patients and students) handling), pedagogical approach (being centered on student's needs and supportive to promote already existing competences), essentials (e.g., discussing skills and examples from the clinical practice), and enhancing reflexivity while discussing specific issues (e.g., confusion between the needs of the patient and those of the student). Individual supervision has been identified as crucial and most satisfactory by students to provide guidance and to foster a reflexive stance enabling them to critically apprehend their communication style. Ultimately, the challenge is to teach medical students to not only connect with the patient but also with themselves.

KEYWORDS:

Breaking bad news; Cancer; Communication; Communication skills training; Oncology; Supervision; Undergraduate medical education

PMID:
29274068
DOI:
10.1007/s13187-017-1313-5
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