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J Biosci Bioeng. 2018 Apr;125(4):448-456. doi: 10.1016/j.jbiosc.2017.11.008. Epub 2017 Dec 19.

Isolation and screening of bacterial isolates from wastewater treatment plants to decolorize azo dyes.

Author information

1
Laboratory for Process Microbial Ecology and Bioinspirational Management (PME&BIM), Department of Microbial and Molecular Systems, KU Leuven, Campus De Nayer, Fortsesteenweg 30A, B-2860 Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium. Electronic address: ken.meerbergen@kuleuven.be.
2
Laboratory for Process Microbial Ecology and Bioinspirational Management (PME&BIM), Department of Microbial and Molecular Systems, KU Leuven, Campus De Nayer, Fortsesteenweg 30A, B-2860 Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium. Electronic address: kris.willems@kuleuven.be.
3
Process and Environmental Technology Lab (PETLab), Department of Chemical Engineering, KU Leuven, Campus De Nayer, B-2860 Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium. Electronic address: raf.dewil@kuleuven.be.
4
Chemical and Biochemical Process Technology and Control (BioTeC), Department of Chemical Engineering, KU Leuven, Technology Campus Ghent, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium. Electronic address: jan.vanimpe@kuleuven.be.
5
Process and Environmental Technology Lab (PETLab), Department of Chemical Engineering, KU Leuven, Campus De Nayer, B-2860 Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium. Electronic address: lise.appels@kuleuven.be.
6
Laboratory for Process Microbial Ecology and Bioinspirational Management (PME&BIM), Department of Microbial and Molecular Systems, KU Leuven, Campus De Nayer, Fortsesteenweg 30A, B-2860 Sint-Katelijne-Waver, Belgium. Electronic address: bart.lievens@kuleuven.be.

Abstract

The discharge of dye-contaminated wastewater into natural waterways presents a substantial risk to human and environmental health, therefore necessitating the treatment and removal of toxic dyes from colored wastewaters before their release into the ecosystem. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize bacterial strains capable of decolorizing and/or degrading azo dyes commonly applied in textile production (monoazo dye Reactive Orange 16 and diazo dye Reactive Green 19) from activated sludge systems used in the treatment of (textile) wastewater. Following a prescreening of 125 isolates for their decolorization potential five strains were retained for further evaluation of decolorization rate and effects of physicochemical parameters using a microtiter plate method. Of those five strains, one strain belonging to the genus Acinetobacter (ST16.16/164) and another belonging to Klebsiella (ST16.16/034) outperformed the other tested strains. Both strains exhibited strong decolorization ability (>80%) within a wide temperature range (20 °C-40 °C) and retained good decolorization activity at temperatures as low as 10 °C (especially strain ST16.16/034). Among the different pH values tested (pH 4, 7 and 10), highest dye removal for both strains occurred at pH 7, with decolorization efficiency remaining relatively high under alkaline conditions (pH 10), and neither isolates decolorization efficiency was negatively impacted by high salt or high dye concentration. Furthermore, both strains displayed the highest rate of decolorization and were able to completely (ST16.16/034) or partly (ST16.16/164) degrade the azo dyes. Altogether, our results support the use of these bacteria in the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing azo dyes.

KEYWORDS:

Activated sludge; Decolorization; Dye degradation; Reactive azo dye; Textile wastewater

PMID:
29273268
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbiosc.2017.11.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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