Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS Biol. 2017 Dec 21;15(12):e2003671. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.2003671. eCollection 2017 Dec.

When enough data are not enough to enact policy: The failure to ban chlorpyrifos.

Trasande L1,2,3,4,5.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America.
2
Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America.
3
Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States of America.
4
NYU Wagner School of Public Service, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America.
5
NYU College of Global Public Health, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America.

Abstract

Strong evidence now supports the notion that organophosphate pesticides damage the fetal brain and produce cognitive and behavioral dysfunction through multiple mechanisms, including thyroid disruption. A regulatory ban was proposed, but actions to end the use of one such pesticide, chlorpyrifos, in agriculture were recently stopped by the Environmental Protection Agency under false scientific pretenses. This manuscript describes the costs and consequences of this policy failure and notes how this case study is emblematic of a broader dismissal of scientific evidence and attacks on scientific norms. Scientists have a responsibility to rebut and decry these serious challenges to human health and scientific integrity.

PMID:
29267272
PMCID:
PMC5739382
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pbio.2003671
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center