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Pediatr Int. 2018 Mar;60(3):240-246. doi: 10.1111/ped.13485.

Transcoronary cell infusion with the stop-flow technique in children with single-ventricle physiology.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.
2
Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.
3
Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.
4
Department of Regenerative Medicine, Center for Innovative Clinical Medicine, Okayama University Hospital, Okayama, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Almost all reports on cardiac regeneration therapy have referred to adults, and only a few have focused on transcoronary infusion of cardiac progenitor cells using the stop-flow technique in children.

METHODS:

Intracoronary autologous cardiosphere-derived cell (CDC) transfer was conducted at Okayama University as a phase 1 clinical trial for seven patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome between January 2011 and December 2012, and as a phase 2 clinical trial for 34 patients with single-ventricle physiology between July 2013 and March 2015.

RESULTS:

A total of 41 patients with single-ventricle physiology underwent transcoronary infusion of CDC with the stop-flow technique. The median age was 33 months (range, 5-70 months) and the median weight was 10.1 kg (range, 4.1-16.0 kg). Transient adverse events occurred during the procedure, including ST-segment elevation or depression, hypotension, bradycardia, and coronary artery vasospasm. All patients completely recovered. There were no major procedure-related adverse events. In this study, transcoronary infusion of CDC using the stop-flow technique was successfully completed in all patients.

CONCLUSION:

Transcoronary infusion of CDC using the stop-flow technique in children is a feasible and safe procedure.

KEYWORDS:

congenital heart disease; regeneration therapy; stop-flow technique; temporary occlusion balloon; transcoronary infusion

PMID:
29266671
DOI:
10.1111/ped.13485
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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