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Sci Rep. 2017 Dec 19;7(1):17766. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-17502-y.

Early Development of Network Oscillations in the Ferret Visual Cortex.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.
2
Neurobiology Curriculum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. flavio_frohlich@med.unc.edu.
4
Neurobiology Curriculum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. flavio_frohlich@med.unc.edu.
5
Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. flavio_frohlich@med.unc.edu.
6
Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. flavio_frohlich@med.unc.edu.
7
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. flavio_frohlich@med.unc.edu.
8
Neuroscience Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA. flavio_frohlich@med.unc.edu.

Abstract

Although oscillations during development have been characterized in a wide range of neural systems, little is known about the interaction between these network oscillations and neuronal spiking, and the interactions among different oscillation frequencies. Here we recorded the spontaneous and visual-elicited local field potential (LFP) and multi-unit activity (MUA) in the visual cortex of freely-moving juvenile ferrets before and after eye-opening. We found that both the spontaneous and visually-elicited LFP power was increased after eye-opening, especially in higher frequency bands (>30 Hz). Spike LFP phase coupling was decreased for lower frequency bands (theta and alpha) but slightly increased for higher frequencies (high-gamma band). A similar shift towards faster frequencies also occurred for phase-amplitude coupling; with maturation, the coupling of the theta/alpha/beta band amplitude to the delta phase was decreased and the high-gamma amplitude coupling to theta/alpha phase was increased. This shift towards higher frequencies was also reflected in the visual responses; the LFP oscillation became more entrained by visual stimulation with higher frequencies (>10 Hz). Taken together, these results suggest gamma oscillation as a signature of the maturation of cortical circuitry.

PMID:
29259184
PMCID:
PMC5736753
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-17502-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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