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J Hosp Infect. 2018 Jun;99(2):153-157. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2017.12.012. Epub 2017 Dec 16.

Optimization of antimicrobial therapy in vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteraemia using a rapid detection Gram-positive blood culture assay.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA; School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
2
Department of Pharmacy, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA; School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
3
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA.
4
School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA; Department of Pharmacy, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. Electronic address: jdchan@u.washington.edu.

Abstract

Rapid molecular blood culture Gram-positive (BC-GP) assay can promptly identify vancomycin-resistant enterococcal (VRE) bloodstream infections (BSIs). We sought to evaluate patients with VRE BSI following the pre (N = 44) and post (N = 20) implementation of Verigene BC-GP assay. The average time to detection of VRE was 25.9 ± 4.1h (95% confidence interval (CI): 17.6-34.1; P < 0.001) earlier with Verigene BC-GP assay. Compared to patients in the pre-Verigene BC-GP period, the mean adjusted difference in time to administration of anti-VRE therapy was 18.2 ± 7.8h (95% CI: 2.5-33.8; P = 0.024) earlier among patients in the post-Verigene BC-GP period.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial optimization; Bacteraemia; Gram-positive blood culture assay; Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus

PMID:
29258920
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhin.2017.12.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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