Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Semin Cancer Biol. 2018 Oct;52(Pt 2):26-38. doi: 10.1016/j.semcancer.2017.12.008. Epub 2017 Dec 16.

Understanding preanalytical variables and their effects on clinical biomarkers of oncology and immunotherapy.

Author information

1
Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB), Cancer Diagnosis Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
2
Preferred Solutions Group, Washington D.C., USA.
3
Kelly Government Solutions, Rockville, Maryland, USA.
4
Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research Branch (BBRB), Cancer Diagnosis Program, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Electronic address: moorehe@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

Identifying a suitable course of immunotherapy treatment for a given patient as well as monitoring treatment response is heavily reliant on biomarkers detected and quantified in blood and tissue biospecimens. Suboptimal or variable biospecimen collection, processing, and storage practices have the potential to alter clinically relevant biomarkers, including those used in cancer immunotherapy. In the present review, we summarize effects reported for immunologically relevant biomarkers and highlight preanalytical factors associated with specific analytical platforms and assays used to predict and gauge immunotherapy response. Given that many of the effects introduced by preanalytical variability are gene-, transcript-, and protein-specific, biospecimen practices should be standardized and validated for each biomarker and assay to ensure accurate results and facilitate clinical implementation of newly identified immunotherapy approaches.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarker; Biospecimen science; Cancer immunotherapy; Preanalytical variability

PMID:
29258857
PMCID:
PMC6004232
[Available on 2019-10-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.semcancer.2017.12.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center