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Dev Cell. 2017 Dec 18;43(6):716-730.e7. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2017.11.018.

Atg5 Disassociates the V1V0-ATPase to Promote Exosome Production and Tumor Metastasis Independent of Canonical Macroautophagy.

Author information

1
Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa, 3131 Roger Guindon Hall, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa K1H 8M5, Canada.
2
Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), U1216, 38042 Grenoble, France; Université Grenoble Alpes, Institut des Neurosciences, 38042 Grenoble, France.
3
Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa K1H 8L6, Canada.
4
Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa, 3131 Roger Guindon Hall, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa K1H 8M5, Canada; Ottawa Institute for System Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa K1H 8M5, Canada. Electronic address: gibbings@uottawa.ca.

Abstract

Autophagy and autophagy-related genes (Atg) have been attributed prominent roles in tumorigenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes are also implicated in cancer metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that exosome production is strongly reduced in cells lacking Atg5 and Atg16L1, but this is independent of Atg7 and canonical autophagy. Atg5 specifically decreases acidification of late endosomes where exosomes are produced, disrupting the acidifying V1V0-ATPase by removing a regulatory component, ATP6V1E1, into exosomes. The effect of Atg5 on exosome production promotes the migration and in vivo metastasis of orthotopic breast cancer cells. These findings uncover mechanisms controlling exosome release and identify means by which autophagy-related genes can contribute to metastasis in autophagy-independent pathways.

KEYWORDS:

LC3; V(1)V(0)-ATPase; acidification; autophagy; cancer; endosome; exosomes; extracellular vesicles; multivesicular body; tumor

PMID:
29257951
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2017.11.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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