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J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci. 2017 Nov 1;56(6):792-801.

Using Telemetry Data to Refine Endpoints for New Zealand White Rabbits Challenged with Bacillus anthracis.

Author information

1
National Biological Threat Characterization Center, National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, Frederick, Maryland.
2
National Biological Threat Characterization Center, National Biodefense Analysis and Countermeasures Center, Frederick, Maryland;, Email: angelo.scorpio@nbacc.dhs.gov.

Abstract

We used a continuous-monitoring digital telemetry system to investigate temperature response in New Zealand White rabbits after inhalation or subcutaneous challenge with Bacillus anthracis. Two spore preparations of B. anthracis Ames A2084 were evaluated by using a nose-only inhalation model, and 2 strains, B. anthracis Ames A2084 and B. anthracis UT500, were evaluated in a subcutaneous model. Animal body temperature greater than 3 SD above the mean baseline temperature was considered a significant increase in body temperature (SIBT). All rabbits that exhibited SIBT after challenge by either route of infection or bacterial strain eventually died or were euthanized due to infection, and all rabbits that died or were euthanized due to infection exhibited SIBT during the course of disease. The time at onset of SIBT preceded clinical signs of disease in 94% of the rabbits tested by as long as 2 days. In addition, continuous temperature monitoring facilitated discrimination between the 2 B. anthracis strains with regard to the time interval between SIBT and death. These data suggest that for the New Zealand White rabbit anthrax model, SIBT is a reliable indicator of infection, is predictive of experimental outcome in the absence of treatment, and is measurable prior to the appearance of more severe signs of disease. The use of digital telemetry to monitor infectious disease course in animal models of anthrax can potentially be used in conjunction with other clinical score metrics to refine endpoint euthanasia criteria.

PMID:
29256375
PMCID:
PMC5710159
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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