Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2018 Feb 5;373(1739). pii: 20160494. doi: 10.1098/rstb.2016.0494.

Antheridial development in the moss Physcomitrella patens: implications for understanding stem cells in mosses.

Author information

1
Division of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192, Japan kofuji@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp.
2
Division of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192, Japan.
3
National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki 444-8585, Japan.
4
Department of Basic Biology, Graduate School for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Okazaki 444-8585, Japan.
5
National Institute for Basic Biology, Okazaki 444-8585, Japan mhasebe@nibb.ac.jp.

Abstract

Stem cells self-renew and produce precursor cells that differentiate to become specialized cell types. Land plants generate several types of stem cells that give rise to most organs of the plant body and whose characters determine the body organization. The moss Physcomitrella patens forms eight types of stem cells throughout its life cycle. Under gametangium-inducing conditions, multiple antheridium apical stem cells are formed at the tip of the gametophore and each antheridium apical stem cell divides to form an antheridium. We found that the gametophore apical stem cell, which typically forms leaf and stem tissues, changes to become a new type of stem cell, which we term the antheridium initial stem cell. This antheridium initial stem cell produces multiple antheridium apical stem cells, resulting in a cluster of antheridia at the tip of gametophore. This is the first report of a land plant stem cell directly producing another type of stem cell during normal development. Notably, the antheridium apical stem cells are distally produced from the antheridium initial stem cell, similar to the root cap stem cells of vascular plants, suggesting the use of similar molecular mechanisms and a possible evolutionary relationship.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The Rhynie cherts: our earliest terrestrial ecosystem revisited'.

KEYWORDS:

Physcomitrella; antheridium; development; sperm; stem cell

PMID:
29254959
PMCID:
PMC5745330
[Available on 2019-02-05]
DOI:
10.1098/rstb.2016.0494
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center