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Health Place. 2018 Jan;49:101-110. doi: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2017.10.004. Epub 2017 Dec 16.

Modest ratios of fast food outlets to supermarkets and green grocers are associated with higher body mass index: Longitudinal analysis of a sample of 15,229 Australians aged 45 years and older in the Australian National Liveability Study.

Author information

1
Population Wellbeing and Environment Research Lab (PowerLab), School of Health and Society, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Australia; Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: xfeng@uow.edu.au.
2
Population Wellbeing and Environment Research Lab (PowerLab), School of Health and Society, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Australia; Menzies Centre for Health Policy, University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: thomasab@uow.edu.au.
3
Centre for Urban Research, School of Global, Urban and Social Studies, RMIT University, Australia.
4
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

Food purchasing decisions are made within the context of the range of options available, yet most epidemiological studies focus upon single outlet types. Ratios of fast food outlets to supermarkets and green grocers were linked to addresses of 15,229 adults in the 45 and Up Study at baseline (2006-2008) and follow-up (2009-2010). Compared to having no fast food outlet but having healthy food outlets within 3.2km from home, multilevel growth curves revealed that relative exposure>25% fast food outlets were associated with 0.36-1.19kg/m2 higher BMI (p<0.05). These associations were consistent as people aged. No associations were observed for food outlets<0.8km.

KEYWORDS:

Australia; Body mass index; Food environment; Multilevel growth curve modelling

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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