Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Semin Cancer Biol. 2018 Aug;51:36-49. doi: 10.1016/j.semcancer.2017.12.004. Epub 2017 Dec 15.

Epigenetic biomarkers in gastrointestinal cancers: The current state and clinical perspectives.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Colorectal Cancer Research Centre, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Centre for Cancer Biomedicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: hege.marie.vedeld@rr-research.no.
2
Center for Gastrointestinal Research, and Center for Translational Genomics and Oncology, Baylor Scott & White Research Institute and Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. Electronic address: Ajay.Goel@BSWHealth.org.
3
Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway; K.G. Jebsen Colorectal Cancer Research Centre, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Centre for Cancer Biomedicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: guro.elisabeth.lind@rr-research.no.

Abstract

Each year, almost 4.1 million people are diagnosed with gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Due to late detection of this disease, the mortality is high, causing approximately 3 million cancer-related deaths annually, worldwide. Although the incidence and survival differs according to organ site, earlier detection and improved prognostication have the potential to reduce overall mortality burden from these cancers. Epigenetic changes, including aberrant promoter DNA methylation, are common events in both cancer initiation and progression. Furthermore, such changes may be identified non-invasively with the use of PCR based methods, in bodily fluids of cancer patients. These features make aberrant DNA methylation a promising substrate for the development of disease biomarkers for early detection, prognosis and for predicting response to therapy. In this article, we will provide an update and current clinical perspectives for DNA methylation alterations in patients with colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, liver and esophageal cancers, and discuss their potential role as cancer biomarkers.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarkers; DNA methylation; Detection; Gastrointestinal cancers; Prognosis

PMID:
29253542
DOI:
10.1016/j.semcancer.2017.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for Norwegian BIBSYS system
Loading ...
Support Center