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Vaccine. 2018 Jan 29;36(5):758-764. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.12.024. Epub 2017 Dec 15.

An updated influenza A(H3N2) vaccine generates limited antibody responses to previously encountered antigens in children.

Author information

1
Department of Pathobiological Sciences, University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
2
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health, Marshfield Clinic Research Institute, 1000 North Oak Ave, Marshfield 54449, WI, USA.
3
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd, Atlanta 30333, GA, USA.
4
Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Population Health, Marshfield Clinic Research Institute, 1000 North Oak Ave, Marshfield 54449, WI, USA. Electronic address: belongia.edward@marshfieldclinic.org.
5
Department of Pathobiological Sciences, University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, Madison, WI 53706, USA; Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, Madison, WI 53715, USA. Electronic address: thomasf@primate.wisc.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Influenza vaccination may provide a "back-boost" to antibodies against previously encountered strains. If the back-boost effect is common, this could allow more aggressive vaccine updates, as emerging variants would be expected to both elicit de-novo responses and boost pre-existing responses against recently circulating strains. Here we used the emergence of an antigenically novel A(H3N2) strain to determine whether an antigenically updated vaccine boosted antibodies against historical strains.

METHODS:

We performed hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assays on pre- and post-vaccination sera from 124 children 5-17 years old who received 2015-2016 inactivated influenza vaccine, containing an antigenically updated A(H3N2) strain. We evaluated the mean fold increase in HI titer against both the 2015-2016 vaccine strain and representative strains from two prior antigenic clusters. Factors associated with post-vaccination titers against historical strains were evaluated using linear regression, adjusting for baseline titer.

RESULTS:

Geometric mean titers against each antigen examined increased significantly after vaccination (P < .0001). Mean fold increase was 3.29 against the vaccine strain and 1.22-1.46 against historical strains. Response to vaccine strain was associated with increased post-vaccination titers against historical strains.

CONCLUSIONS:

A vaccine containing an antigenically novel A(H3N2) strain modestly boosted antibody responses against historical influenza strains in children.

KEYWORDS:

Back-boost; Influenza; Pediatrics; Vaccine

PMID:
29249543
PMCID:
PMC5773382
[Available on 2019-01-29]
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.12.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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