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J Exp Med. 2018 Jan 2;215(1):357-375. doi: 10.1084/jem.20171389. Epub 2017 Dec 15.

Mannose receptor high, M2 dermal macrophages mediate nonhealing Leishmania major infection in a Th1 immune environment.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD.
2
Navidea Biopharmaceuticals, Dublin, OH.
3
Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD dsacks@niaid.nih.gov.

Abstract

The origin and functional specialization of dermal macrophages in cutaneous infections have been little studied. In this paper, we show that a strain of Leishmania major (L. major Seidman [LmSd]) that produces nonhealing cutaneous lesions in conventionally resistant C57BL/6 mice was more efficiently taken up by M2-polarized bone marrow (BM)-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in vitro and by mannose receptor (MR)hi dermal macrophages in vivo compared with a healing strain (L. major Friedlin V1). Both in steady and in T helper type 1 (Th1) cell-driven inflammatory states, the MRhi dermal macrophages showed M2 characteristics. The dermal macrophages were radio resistant and not replaced by monocytes or adult BM-derived cells during infection, but were locally maintained by IL-4 and IL-10. Notably, the favored infection of M2 BMDMs by LmSd in vitro was MR dependent, and genetic deletion of MR or selective depletion of MRhi dermal macrophages by anti-CSF-1 receptor antibody reversed the nonhealing phenotype. We conclude that embryonic-derived, MRhi dermal macrophages are permissive for parasite growth even in a strong Th1-immune environment, and the preferential infection of these cells plays a crucial role in the severity of cutaneous disease.

PMID:
29247046
PMCID:
PMC5748861
DOI:
10.1084/jem.20171389
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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