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Exp Mol Pathol. 2018 Feb;104(1):12-18. doi: 10.1016/j.yexmp.2017.11.017. Epub 2017 Dec 12.

Alteration of Connexin43 expression in a rat model of obesity-related glomerulopathy.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, The Second Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, China. Electronic address: zhaoyongli79@163.com.
2
Department of Pediatrics, The Second Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, China.

Abstract

It is accepted that alteration of connexin43 (Cx43) expression in glomeruli is a common pathological response in several forms of kidney diseases. To date, however the change of the Cx43 expression in obesity-related glomerulopathy (ORG) has not been reported. In this study, the alteration of Cx43 expression in the glomeruli of rat with ORG was defined. Five-week-old rats were fed with high-fat diet for 18weeks to establish the ORG model, then the histological change of glomeruli, the foot process effacement of podocyte, the markers for podocyte injury (nephrin,podocin and WT1) and Cx43 expression in glomeruli were examined respectively. The results demonstrated metabolic disorder, hyperinsulinemia, systemic inflammation and microalbuminuria in ORG rats. There was significant hypertrophy, glomerular expansion and inflammatory cell infiltration in the kidney of ORG rats compared to the control group. Significant foot process effacement of the podocyte in the glomeruli, nephrin loss and density reduction were shown in the ORG rats, and Cx43 expression was significant upregulated in glomeruli of ORG rats compared to the control group. The results indicate the correlation of overexpressed Cx43 with the obesity related renal inflammation and suggest that Cx43 might be a potential target in the development of obesity related glomerulopathy.

KEYWORDS:

Connexin43; Inflammation; Obesity; Obesity-related glomerulopathy

PMID:
29246788
DOI:
10.1016/j.yexmp.2017.11.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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