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Cell. 2017 Dec 14;171(7):1481-1493. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2017.11.024.

Our Gut Microbiome: The Evolving Inner Self.

Author information

1
Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551, Singapore; Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551, Singapore. Electronic address: pkundu@ntu.edu.sg.
2
Department of Immunology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel.
3
Department of Immunology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 7610001 Rehovot, Israel. Electronic address: eran.elinav@weizmann.ac.il.
4
Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551, Singapore; Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 60 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637551, Singapore; Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: sven.pettersson@ki.se.

Abstract

The "holobiont" concept, defined as the collective contribution of the eukaryotic and prokaryotic counterparts to the multicellular organism, introduces a complex definition of individuality enabling a new comprehensive view of human evolution and personalized characteristics. Here, we provide snapshots of the evolving microbial-host associations and relations during distinct milestones across the lifespan of a human being. We discuss the current knowledge of biological symbiosis between the microbiome and its host and portray the challenges in understanding these interactions and their potential effects on human physiology, including microbiome-nervous system inter-relationship and its relevance to human variation and individuality.

KEYWORDS:

Microbiome; aging; lifespan; nervous system; neurodegenerative disorders

PMID:
29245010
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2017.11.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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