Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2018 Mar 1;103(3):972-982. doi: 10.1210/jc.2017-02014.

Patterns of Plasma Glucagon Dynamics Do Not Match Metabolic Phenotypes in Young Women.

Author information

1
Diabetes Research Group, Medizinische Klinik IV, Medical Center of the University of Munich (Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen), Munich, Germany.
2
Clinical Cooperation Group Type 2 Diabetes, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Neuherberg, Germany.
3
German Center for Diabetes Research, Neuherberg, Germany.
4
Department of Clinical Radiology, Medical Center of the University of Munich (Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen), Munich, Germany.
5
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Medical Center of the University of Munich (Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen), Munich, Germany.

Abstract

Context:

The role of hyperglucagonemia in type 2 diabetes is still debated.

Objective:

We analyzed glucagon dynamics during oral glucose tolerance tests (oGTTs) in young women with one out of three metabolic phenotypes: healthy control (normoglycemic after a normoglycemic pregnancy), normoglycemic high-risk (normoglycemic after a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes), and prediabetes/screening-diagnosed type 2 diabetes. We asked if glucagon patterns were homogeneous within the metabolic phenotypes.

Design and Setting:

Five-point oGTT, sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for glucagon, and functional data analysis with unsupervised clustering.

Participants:

Cross-sectional analysis of 285 women from the monocenter observational study Prediction, Prevention, and Subclassification of gestational and type 2 Diabetes, recruited between November 2011 and May 2016.

Results:

We found four patterns of glucagon dynamics that did not match the metabolic phenotypes. Elevated fasting glucagon and delayed glucagon suppression was overrepresented with prediabetes/diabetes, but this was only detected in 21% of this group. It also occurred in 8% of the control group.

Conclusions:

We conclude that hyperglucagonemia may contribute to type 2 diabetes in a subgroup of affected individuals but that it is not a sine qua non for the disease. This should be considered in future pathophysiological studies and when testing pharmacotherapies addressing glucagon signaling.

PMID:
29244078
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2017-02014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center