Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BJPsych Open. 2017 Nov 30;3(6):291-299. doi: 10.1192/bjpo.bp.117.005322. eCollection 2017 Nov.

Mental health difficulties and suicidal behaviours among young migrants: multicentre study of European adolescents.

Author information

1
, PhD, National Suicide Research Foundation, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
2
, MD, MRCPsych, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Health Service Executive, Cork, Ireland.
3
, PhD, FRCPsych, Department of Psychiatry, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.
4
, MD, PhD, National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
5
, PhD, National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health (NASP), Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York, USA.
6
, MD, PhD, Department of Medicine and Health Science, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy; National Institute for Health, Migration and Poverty, Rome, Italy.
7
, MD, Schneider Children's Medical Centre of Israel, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
8
, MD, PhD, Vadaskert Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Hospital, Budapest, Hungary; Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary.
9
, MSc, Addiction Help Services B.I.N., Innsbruck, Austria.
10
, MD, PhD, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental - CIBERSAM, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain.
11
, MD, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Centre of Psychosocial Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
12
, MD, PhD, Clinical Psychology Department, Iuliu Hatieganu University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
13
, MD, MSc, Department Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Tirol Kliniken, Hospital Hall in Tyrol, Innsbruck, Austria.
14
, MD, Clinic of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Centre of Psychosocial Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
15
, MD, PhD, University of Lorraine, Nancy, France and Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire de Nancy, Nancy, France; Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, Centre Psychothérapique de Nancy, Nancy, France.
16
, MA, Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary; Doctoral School of Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.
17
, BSc, Slovene Centre for Suicide Research, Andrej Marusic Institute, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia.
18
, PhD, Slovene Centre for Suicide Research, Andrej Marusic Institute, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia.
19
, PhD, Estonian-Swedish Mental Health and Suicidology Institute (ERSI), Tallinn, Estonia; School of Governance, Law and Society, Tallinn University, Tallinn, Estonia.
20
, MA, Department of Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology, Centre Psychothérapique de Nancy, Nancy, France.
21
, PhD, Estonian-Swedish Mental Health and Suicidology Institute (ERSI), Tallinn, Estonia.
22
, DrPh, MPH, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York, USA; Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

Background:

Migration has been reported to be associated with higher prevalence of mental disorders and suicidal behaviour.

Aims:

To examine the prevalence of emotional and behavioural difficulties, suicidal ideation and suicide attempts among migrant adolescents and their non-migrant peers.

Method:

A school-based survey was completed by 11 057 European adolescents as part of the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) study.

Results:

A previous suicide attempt was reported by 386 (3.6%) adolescents. Compared with non-migrants, first-generation migrants had an elevated prevalence of suicide attempts (odds ratio (OR) 2.08; 95% CI 1.32-3.26; P=0.001 for European migrants and OR 1.86; 95% CI 1.06-3.27; P=0.031 for non-European migrants) and significantly higher levels of peer difficulties. Highest levels of conduct and hyperactivity problems were found among migrants of non-European origin.

Conclusions:

Appropriate mental health services and school-based supports are required to meet the complex needs of migrant adolescents.

Declaration of interest:

None.

Copyright and usage:

© The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center