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Sci Rep. 2017 Dec 12;7(1):17479. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-14981-x.

High-Resolution Single Particle Zeta Potential Characterisation of Biological Nanoparticles using Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing.

Author information

1
School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia. robert@izon.com.
2
Izon Science US Limited, 85 Bolton Street, STE 108, Cambridge, MA, 02140, USA.
3
Mucosal Diseases Group, Translational Research Institute, The University of Queensland, 37 Kent St., Woolloongabba, QLD 4102, Australia.
4
School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, 20 Cornwall St., Woolloongabba, QLD 4102, Australia.
5
William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA.
6
The Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA.
7
Scientific Affairs, American Red Cross, Rockville, MD, 20877, USA.
8
Cerus Corporation, Concord, CA, 94520, USA.
9
Izon Science Limited, 8C Homersham Place, PO Box 39168, Burnside, Christchurch 8053, New Zealand.

Abstract

Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, such as size, shape, surface charge, density, and porosity play a central role in biological interactions and hence accurate determination of these characteristics is of utmost importance. Here we propose tunable resistive pulse sensing for simultaneous size and surface charge measurements on a particle-by-particle basis, enabling the analysis of a wide spectrum of nanoparticles and their mixtures. Existing methodologies for measuring zeta potential of nanoparticles using resistive pulse sensing are significantly improved by including convection into the theoretical model. The efficacy of this methodology is demonstrated for a range of biological case studies, including measurements of mixed anionic, cationic liposomes, extracellular vesicles in plasma, and in situ time study of DNA immobilisation on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles. The high-resolution single particle size and zeta potential characterisation will provide a better understanding of nano-bio interactions, positively impacting nanomedicine development and their regulatory approval.

PMID:
29234015
PMCID:
PMC5727177
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-14981-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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