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Trends Plant Sci. 2018 Mar;23(3):260-271. doi: 10.1016/j.tplants.2017.11.007. Epub 2017 Dec 9.

Coping with 'Dark Sides of the Sun' through Photoreceptor Signaling.

Author information

1
Department of Botany and Plant Biology, Section of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
2
Department of Botany and Plant Biology, Section of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Institute of Genetics and Genomics of Geneva (iGE3), University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: michel.goldschmidt-clermont@unige.ch.
3
Department of Botany and Plant Biology, Section of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland; Institute of Genetics and Genomics of Geneva (iGE3), University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: roman.ulm@unige.ch.

Abstract

Plants grow in constantly changing environments, including highly variable light intensities. Sunlight provides the energy that drives photosynthesis and is thus of the utmost importance for plant growth and the generation of oxygen, which the majority of life on Earth depends on. However, exposure to either insufficient or excess levels of light can have detrimental effects and cause light stress. Whereas exposure to insufficient light limits photosynthetic activity, resulting in 'energy starvation', exposure to excess light can damage the photosynthetic apparatus. Furthermore, strong sunlight is associated with high levels of potentially damaging UV-B radiation. Different classes of photoreceptors play important roles in coping with the negative aspects of sunlight, for which specific mechanisms are emerging that are reviewed here.

KEYWORDS:

UVR8; abiotic stress; acclimation; non-photochemical quenching; photoprotection; phototropin

PMID:
29233601
DOI:
10.1016/j.tplants.2017.11.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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