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Foods. 2017 Dec 11;6(12). pii: E110. doi: 10.3390/foods6120110.

Lactobacillus plantarum with Broad Antifungal Activity as a Protective Starter Culture for Bread Production.

Author information

1
Department of Science of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Foggia, Via Napoli 25, 71122 Foggia, Italy. pasquale.russo@unifg.it.
2
Promis Biotech Via Napoli 25, 71122 Foggia, Italy. pasquale.russo@unifg.it.
3
Council for Agricultural Research and Economics-Research Centre for Cereal and Industrial Crops (CREA-CI), S.S.673 km 25.200, 71122 Foggia, Italy. clara.fares@crea.gov.it.
4
Department of Science of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Foggia, Via Napoli 25, 71122 Foggia, Italy. angela.longo@unifg.it.
5
Department of Science of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Foggia, Via Napoli 25, 71122 Foggia, Italy. giuseppe.spano@unifg.it.
6
Department of Science of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Foggia, Via Napoli 25, 71122 Foggia, Italy. vittorio.capozzi@unifg.it.

Abstract

Bread is a staple food consumed worldwide on a daily basis. Fungal contamination of bread is a critical concern for producers since it is related to important economic losses and safety hazards due to the negative impact of sensorial quality and to the potential occurrence of mycotoxins. In this work, Lactobacillus plantarum UFG 121, a strain with characterized broad antifungal activity, was analyzed as a potential protective culture for bread production. Six different molds belonging to Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., and Fusarium culmorum were used to artificially contaminate bread produced with two experimental modes: (i) inoculation of the dough with a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (control) and (ii) co-inoculation of the dough with the commercial S. cerevisiae strain and with L. plantarum UFG 121. L. plantarum strain completely inhibited the growth of F. culmorum after one week of storage. The lactic acid bacterium modulated the mold growth in samples contaminated with Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Penicillium expansum, while no antagonistic effect was found against Aspergillus niger and Penicillium roqueforti. These results indicate the potential of L. plantarum UFG 121 as a biocontrol agent in bread production and suggest a species- or strain-depending sensitivity of the molds to the same microbial-based control strategy.

KEYWORDS:

Aspergillus; Fusarium; Lactobacillus plantarum; Penicillium; antifungal; bioprotection; bread; phenyllactic acid

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