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Mol Nutr Food Res. 2018 Mar;62(5). doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201700117. Epub 2018 Feb 22.

Dietary Slowly Digestible Starch Triggers the Gut-Brain Axis in Obese Rats with Accompanied Reduced Food Intake.

Author information

1
Whistler Center for Carbohydrate Research, Department of Food Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
2
Department of Psychological Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.
3
School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China.
4
Department of Food and Nutrition, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

SCOPE:

Slowly digestible starch (SDS), as a functional carbohydrate providing a slow and sustained glucose release, may be able to modulate food intake through activation of the gut-brain axis.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Diet-induced obese rats were used to test the effect on feeding behavior of high-fat (HF) diets containing an SDS, fabricated to digest into the ileum, as compared to rapidly digestible starch (RDS). Ingestion of the HF-SDS diet over an 11-week period reduced daily food intake, through smaller meal size, to the same level as a lean body control group, while the group consuming the HF-RDS diet remained at a high food intake. Expression levels (mRNA) of the hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) were significantly reduced, and the anorexigenic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) was increased, in the HF-SDS fed group compared to the HF-RDS group, and to the level of the lean control group.

CONCLUSION:

SDS with digestion into the ileum reduced daily food intake and paralleled suppressed expression of appetite-stimulating neuropeptide genes associated with the gut-brain axis. This novel finding suggests further exploration involving a clinical study and potential development of SDS-based functional foods as an approach to obesity control.

KEYWORDS:

food intake; gut-brain axis; meal size; obesity; slowly digestible starch

PMID:
29230947
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.201700117
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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