Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2018 Apr;168(2):467-479. doi: 10.1007/s10549-017-4578-9. Epub 2017 Dec 11.

Dietary intake of soy and cruciferous vegetables and treatment-related symptoms in Chinese-American and non-Hispanic White breast cancer survivors.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3800 Reservoir Rd NW, Washington, D.C., 20057, USA.
2
Department of Statistics, National Taipei University, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, USA.
4
Department of Nutrition, Simmons College, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Nutrition, Chang Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
7
Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University, Washington, D.C., 20052, USA.
8
Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, 3800 Reservoir Rd NW, Washington, D.C., 20057, USA. jw235@georgetown.edu.
9
, 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Suite 4100, Washington, D.C., 20007, USA. jw235@georgetown.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This project was undertaken to examine the association between dietary intake of soy or cruciferous vegetables and breast cancer treatment-related symptoms among Chinese-American (CA) and Non-Hispanic White (NHW) breast cancer survivors.

METHODS:

This cross-sectional study included 192 CA and 173 NHW female breast cancer survivors (stages 0-III, diagnosed between 2006 and 2012) recruited from two California cancer registries, who had completed primary treatment. Patient-reported data on treatment-related symptoms and potential covariates were collected via telephone interviews. Dietary data were ascertained by mailed questionnaires. The outcomes evaluated were menopausal symptoms (hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, vaginal discharge), joint problems, fatigue, hair thinning/loss, and memory problems. Associations between soy and cruciferous vegetables and symptoms were assessed using logistic regression. Analyses were further stratified by race/ethnicity and endocrine therapy usage (non-user, tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors).

RESULTS:

Soy food and cruciferous vegetable intake ranged from no intake to 431 and 865 g/day, respectively, and was higher in CA survivors. Higher soy food intake was associated with lower odds of menopausal symptoms (≥ 24.0 vs. 0 g/day, OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.25, 1.03), and fatigue (≥ 24.0 vs. 0 g/day, OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.22, 0.84). However, when stratified by race/ethnicity, associations were statistically significant in NHW survivors only. Compared with low intake, higher cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with lower odds of experiencing menopausal symptoms (≥ 70.8 vs. < 33.0 g/day, OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.25, 0.97) in the overall population.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this population of breast cancer survivors, higher soy and cruciferous vegetable intake was associated with less treatment-related menopausal symptoms and fatigue.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer survivors; Cruciferous vegetables; Endocrine therapy; Late treatment effects; Soy foods

PMID:
29230660
PMCID:
PMC5928523
DOI:
10.1007/s10549-017-4578-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center