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Acad Pediatr. 2018 May - Jun;18(4):376-383. doi: 10.1016/j.acap.2017.12.001. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

Agreement Between Parent Proxy Report and Child Self-Report of Pain Intensity and Health-Related Quality of Life After Surgery.

Author information

1
University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Wash; Centers for Clinical and Translational Research and Child Health Behavior and Development, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Wash.
2
Centers for Clinical and Translational Research and Child Health Behavior and Development, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Wash; Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.
3
Centers for Clinical and Translational Research and Child Health Behavior and Development, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Wash; Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash; Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.
4
Centers for Clinical and Translational Research and Child Health Behavior and Development, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Wash; Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. Electronic address: Jennifer.rabbitts@seattlechildrens.org.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Monitoring patient-centered health outcomes after hospital discharge is important for identifying patients experiencing poor recovery after surgery. Utilizing parent reports may improve the feasibility of monitoring recovery when children are not available to provide self-report. We therefore aimed to examine agreement between parent and child reports of child pain and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children after hospital discharge from inpatient surgery.

METHODS:

A total of 295 children aged 8 to 18 years and their parents reported on child pain intensity using an 11-point numerical rating scale and on HRQOL using the 0- to 100-point Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Version 4.0 Generic Core Scales by phone or online, 4 to 8 weeks after surgery. Agreement between parent and child ratings was assessed by absolute discrepancy scores, Pearson product-moment correlations, 2-way mixed effects intraclass correlation coefficient models, and linear regression models.

RESULTS:

We found good to excellent agreement between child and parent reports of pain intensity and HRQOL. Average absolute discrepancy scores of pain intensity and HRQOL were 0.6 and 7.8 points, respectively. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients were 0.74 and 0.80, and intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.72 and 0.79, for pain intensity and HRQOL, respectively. Regression coefficients for models examining pain intensity and HRQOL were 0.93 to 0.98 and 1.0, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although child and parent reports may both contribute important information, parent report is a valid proxy for child self-reported pain intensity and HRQOL after discharge from inpatient pediatric surgery, which may prove important for better understanding pain experiences and intervention needs.

KEYWORDS:

inpatient; pain; pediatrics; quality of life

PMID:
29229566
PMCID:
PMC5936667
DOI:
10.1016/j.acap.2017.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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