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Med Eng Phys. 2018 Jan;51:56-66. doi: 10.1016/j.medengphy.2017.11.010. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

Integrated experimental and computational approach to laser machining of structural bone.

Author information

1
Laboratory for Laser Aided Additive and Subtractive Manufacturing, Virtual Center for Advanced Orthopaedics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle #305310, Denton, TX 76203-5017, USA. Electronic address: Narendra.Dahotre@unt.edu.
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai 600036, India.
3
Laboratory for Laser Aided Additive and Subtractive Manufacturing, Virtual Center for Advanced Orthopaedics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle #305310, Denton, TX 76203-5017, USA.
4
Laboratory for Laser Aided Additive and Subtractive Manufacturing, Virtual Center for Advanced Orthopaedics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle #305310, Denton, TX 76203-5017, USA; The Joint Studio, Hollywood Medical Centre, 85 Monash Avenue, Nedlands, WA 6009, Australia; Australian Institute of Robotic Orthopaedics, 2 Centro Avenue, Subiaco, WA 6008, Australia ; Department of Computing, School of Electrical Engineering and Computing, Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia.
5
Laboratory for Laser Aided Additive and Subtractive Manufacturing, Virtual Center for Advanced Orthopaedics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle #305310, Denton, TX 76203-5017, USA; Australian Institute of Robotic Orthopaedics, 2 Centro Avenue, Subiaco, WA 6008, Australia ; Department of Computing, School of Electrical Engineering and Computing, Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia.
6
Department of Computing, School of Electrical Engineering and Computing, Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia.
7
Department of Physics and Astronomy, School of Science and Engineering, Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley, WA 6102, Australia.

Abstract

This study describes the fundamentals of laser-bone interaction during bone machining through an integrated experimental-computational approach. Two groups of laser machining parameters identified the effects of process thermodynamics and kinetics on machining attributes at micro to macro. A continuous wave Yb-fiber Nd:YAG laser (wavelength 1070 nm) with fluences in the range of 3.18 J/mm2-8.48 J/mm2 in combination of laser power (300 W-700 W) and machining speed (110 mm/s-250 mm/s) were considered for machining trials. The machining attributes were evaluated through scanning electron microscopy observations and compared with finite element based multiphysics-multicomponent computational model predicted values. For both groups of laser machining parameters, experimentally evaluated and computationally predicted depths and widths increased with increased laser energy input and computationally predicted widths remained higher than experimentally measured widths whereas computationally predicted depths were slightly higher than experimentally measured depths and reversed this trend for the laser fluence >6 J/mm2. While in both groups, the machining rate increased with increased laser fluence, experimentally derived machining rate remained lower than the computationally predicted values for the laser fluences lower than ∼4.75 J/mm2 for one group and ∼5.8 J/mm2 for other group and reversed in this trend thereafter. The integrated experimental-computational approach identified the physical processes affecting machining attributes.

KEYWORDS:

Laser; Machining; Orthopaedic; Structural bone

PMID:
29229404
DOI:
10.1016/j.medengphy.2017.11.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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