Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Respir Med. 2017 Nov;132:146-148. doi: 10.1016/j.rmed.2017.10.012. Epub 2017 Oct 18.

Who's at risk of thunderstorm asthma? The ryegrass pollen trifecta and lessons learnt from the Melbourne thunderstorm epidemic.

Author information

1
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: joy.lee@alfred.org.au.
2
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
3
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; Allergy, Immunology & Respiratory Medicine, Central Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
4
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

The Melbourne thunderstorm asthma epidemic in November 2016 was unprecedented in scale and impact. We systematically reviewed our hospital's patients with thunderstorm asthma to identify key risk factors. Of 85 adult patients assessed, the majority (60%) had no prior diagnosis of asthma. However, allergic rhinitis during the grass pollen season was almost universal (99%), as were ryegrass pollen sensitization (100%) and exposure to the outdoor environment during the thunderstorm (94%). Airborne pollen levels on the thunderstorm day were extreme. We conclude that ryegrass pollen sensitization, clinical allergic rhinitis, and acute allergen exposure constitute a risk-factor 'trifecta' for thunderstorm asthma.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma; Hayfever; Meteorology; Rhinitis; Ryegrass; Thunderstorm

PMID:
29229087
DOI:
10.1016/j.rmed.2017.10.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center