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J Sch Health. 2018 Jan;88(1):9-14. doi: 10.1111/josh.12574.

Longitudinal Trajectory of the Relationship Between Self-Esteem and Substance Use From Adolescence to Young Adulthood.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Education, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, South Korea.
2
Department of Applied Health Science, Indiana University School of Public Health, Suite 116, 1025 East 7th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7109.
3
Indiana University School of Public Health, 1025 East 7th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7109.
4
Department of Applied Health Science, Indiana University School of Public Health, 1025 East 7th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405-7109.
5
Department of Health Management, Sahmyook University, 815, Hwarang-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 01795, South Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We examined the longitudinal trajectory of substance use (binge drinking, marijuana use, and cocaine use) in relation to self-esteem from adolescence to young adulthood.

METHODS:

Generalized estimating equation models were fit using SAS to investigate changes in the relation between self-esteem and each substance use (binge drinking, marijuana use, and cocaine use) from adolescence to young adulthood. Data were drawn from the 3 waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a nationally representative sample of middle and high school students in the United States (N = 6504).

RESULTS:

Self-esteem was a significant predictor for the use of all 3 substances at 15 years of age (ps < .001). However, at age 21, self-esteem no longer predicted binge drinking and marijuana use in the controlled model.

CONCLUSIONS:

It appears that self-esteem loses its protective role against substance use except cocaine use as adolescents transition to young adulthood.

KEYWORDS:

adolescents; self-esteem; substance use; young adults

PMID:
29224217
DOI:
10.1111/josh.12574
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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