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Audiol Neurootol. 2017;22(4-5):218-225. doi: 10.1159/000481279. Epub 2017 Dec 9.

Evidence of Osteoclastic Activity in the Human Temporal Bone.

Author information

1
Otopathology Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Bone remodeling within the otic capsule has been reported to be inhibited especially at or near the cochlea, except under some pathological conditions such as otosclerosis, Paget's disease, or mastoiditis, when bone remodeling can occur. Microcavitations found in periosteal and endosteal layers of human temporal bone specimens without otosclerosis, Paget's disease, or inflammation as reported in the current study are consistent with osteoclastic bone resorption. Thirty-three temporal bones from 33 patients were prepared for light microscopy and classified into 4 groups: histologically proven dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal (SSCD) (n = 3, group 1), age 20 years or younger (n = 10, group 2), age 90 years or older and with otosclerosis (n = 10, group 3), and age 90 years or older without otosclerosis (n = 10, group 4). Microcavitation was seen at 7 anatomic locations in the temporal bone in all 4 groups, but not in the cochlea or vestibule. Microcavitation within the temporal bone is likely due to osteoclastic activity, and it is seen in both young and old patients, patients with and without otosclerosis, and in cases with SSCD.

KEYWORDS:

Bone resorption; Histopathology; Human; Microcavitation; Osteoclast; Superior semicircular canal dehiscence

PMID:
29224005
DOI:
10.1159/000481279
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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