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Arch Med Res. 2017 Nov;48(8):727-734. doi: 10.1016/j.arcmed.2017.11.004. Epub 2017 Dec 6.

Gut Microbiome and Antibiotics.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine NYU Langone Health, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: tadasu.iizumi@nyumc.org.
2
Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine NYU Langone Health, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Despite that the human gastrointestinal tract is the most populated ecological niche by bacteria in the human body, much is still unknown about its characteristics. This site is highly susceptible to the effects of many external factors that may affect in the quality and the quantity of the microbiome. Specific factors such as diet, personal hygiene, pharmacological drugs and the use of antibiotics can produce a significant impact on the gut microbiota. The effect of these factors is more relevant early in life, when the gut microbiota has not yet fully established. In this review, we discussed the effect of type and doses of the antibiotics on the gut microbiota and what the major consequences in the use and abuse of these antimicrobial agents.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotic treatments; Autoimmune diseases; Microbiome; Obesity

PMID:
29221800
DOI:
10.1016/j.arcmed.2017.11.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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