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Cell Res. 2018 Mar;28(3):265-280. doi: 10.1038/cr.2017.155. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

Mitochondrial metabolism and cancer.

Porporato PE1, Filigheddu N2, Pedro JMB3,4,5,6,7, Kroemer G3,4,5,6,7,8,9, Galluzzi L3,10,11.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences, Molecular Biotechnology Center, 10124 Torino, Italy.
2
Department of Translational Medicine, University of Piemonte Orientale, 28100 Novara, Italy.
3
Université Paris Descartes/Paris V, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 75006 Paris, France.
4
Université Pierre et Marie Curie/Paris VI, 75006 Paris, France.
5
Equipe 11 labellisée par la Ligue contre le Cancer, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, 75006 Paris, France.
6
INSERM, U1138, 75006 Paris, France.
7
Metabolomics and Cell Biology Platforms, Gustave Roussy Comprehensive Cancer Institute, 94805 Villejuif, France.
8
Pôle de Biologie, Hopitâl Européen George Pompidou, AP-HP, 75015 Paris, France.
9
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska University Hospital, 17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
10
Department of Radiation Oncology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA.
11
Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA.

Abstract

Glycolysis has long been considered as the major metabolic process for energy production and anabolic growth in cancer cells. Although such a view has been instrumental for the development of powerful imaging tools that are still used in the clinics, it is now clear that mitochondria play a key role in oncogenesis. Besides exerting central bioenergetic functions, mitochondria provide indeed building blocks for tumor anabolism, control redox and calcium homeostasis, participate in transcriptional regulation, and govern cell death. Thus, mitochondria constitute promising targets for the development of novel anticancer agents. However, tumors arise, progress, and respond to therapy in the context of an intimate crosstalk with the host immune system, and many immunological functions rely on intact mitochondrial metabolism. Here, we review the cancer cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic mechanisms through which mitochondria influence all steps of oncogenesis, with a focus on the therapeutic potential of targeting mitochondrial metabolism for cancer therapy.

PMID:
29219147
PMCID:
PMC5835768
DOI:
10.1038/cr.2017.155
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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