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J Diabetes Complications. 2018 Feb;32(2):139-143. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2017.11.005. Epub 2017 Nov 11.

Relationship between individual categories of adverse childhood experience and diabetes in adulthood in a sample of US adults: Does it differ by gender?

Author information

1
Department of Health Science, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA, USA; Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Rd, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA; Center for Patient Care and Outcomes Research (PCOR), Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.
2
Department of Health Science, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, CA, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Rd, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA; Center for Patient Care and Outcomes Research (PCOR), Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Rd, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA; Center for Patient Care and Outcomes Research (PCOR), Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA. Electronic address: legede@mcw.edu.

Abstract

AIMS:

ACEs are known to increase risk for diabetes in adulthood. However, little is known about the differential impact of individual ACE categories on diabetes risk, and whether this relationship is gender specific.

METHODS:

Data from the 2011 BRFSS was used in this study. Participants included 48,526 adults who completed the ACE module across 5 states. Using logistic regression, we examined the odds of diabetes in adulthood related to eight individual categories of ACEs: sexual abuse, physical abuse, verbal abuse, mental illness, substance abuse, incarceration, separation/divorce, and violence. A gender interaction term was included to test if this relationship varied between men and women.

RESULTS:

In adjusted analyses, sexual abuse (OR 1.57, CI 1.240; 1.995) had the strongest positive association followed by verbal (OR 1.29, CI 1.117; 1.484) and physical abuse (OR 1.26, CI 1.040; 1.516). Having a parent with mental illness was also significantly associated with increased odds of diabetes (OR 1.19, CI 0.996; 1.416). No interaction between ACEs and diabetes status by gender in any of the eight categories was found.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall, this study found that four ACE categories were significantly associated with increased odds of diabetes in adulthood with sexual abuse being the strongest predictor.

KEYWORDS:

Abuse categories; Adverse childhood experiences; Diabetes; Gender

PMID:
29217352
PMCID:
PMC5750098
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2017.11.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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