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Laryngoscope. 2017 Dec 7. doi: 10.1002/lary.27040. [Epub ahead of print]

An app to enhance resident education in otolaryngology.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey.
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, U.S.A.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Technological change is leading to an evolution in medical education. The objective of our study was to assess the impact of a medical knowledge app, called PulseQD, on resident education within our otolaryngology-head and neck surgery department at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Bronx, NY).

METHODS:

A prospective cohort study was conducted within the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery from July 2016 to June 2017. All faculty attendings and residents were asked to participate in the study and were included. A Web and mobile-based app, PulseQD, that allowed for collaborative learning was implemented. Questionnaires were given at the beginning and end of the academic year. Otolaryngology Training Exam (OTE) scores were collected RESULTS: A total of 20 residents and 13 faculty members participated in the study. Residents used online sources of medical information significantly more often than faculty (90% and 54%, respectively, P = 0.0179). Residents and faculty felt that PulseQD offered a valuable perspective on clinically relevant medical information (P = 0.0003), was a great way to test clinical and medical knowledge (P = 0.0001), and improved the sharing and discussing of medical knowledge (P < 0.0001). There was a statistically significant 5.8% improvement in OTE scores (P = 0.0008) at the end of the academic year.

CONCLUSION:

The implementation of a novel mobile app, PulseQD, was well received by residents and faculty in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Preliminary data suggest that app-based learning may lead to improved performance on knowledge-based assessments.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

NA. Laryngoscope, 2017.

KEYWORDS:

Mobile application; app; education; otolaryngology; question bank; smartphone; social media

PMID:
29214641
DOI:
10.1002/lary.27040
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