Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Dement Neuropsychol. 2010 Oct-Dec;4(4):277-286. doi: 10.1590/S1980-57642010DN40400005.

Musical training, neuroplasticity and cognition.

Author information

1
MSc, Neurosciences Graduation Program, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte MG, Brazil.
2
PhD, Department of Instruments and Singing, School of Music, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte MG, Brazil.
3
MD, PhD. Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology Research Group, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte MG, Brazil.

Abstract

in English, Portuguese

The influence of music on the human brain has been recently investigated in numerous studies. Several investigations have shown that structural and functional cerebral neuroplastic processes emerge as a result of long-term musical training, which in turn may produce cognitive differences between musicians and non-musicians. Musicians can be considered ideal cases for studies on brain adaptation, due to their unique and intensive training experiences. This article presents a review of recent findings showing positive effects of musical training on non-musical cognitive abilities, which probably reflect plastic changes in brains of musicians.

KEYWORDS:

cognitive abilities; musical training; neuroplasticity

Conflict of interest statement

Disclosure: The authors report no conflicts of interest.

Publication type

Publication type

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center