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Cell Rep. 2017 Dec 5;21(10):2785-2795. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2017.11.020.

Differential Effects of EGFL6 on Tumor versus Wound Angiogenesis.

Author information

1
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Gene Therapy Research Unit, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Center for RNA Interference and Non-Coding RNA, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
3
Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701, South Korea.
4
Texas Therapeutics Institute, Brown Foundation Institute of Molecular Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
5
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.
6
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
7
Department of Surgery, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan 00936, Puerto Rico; University of Puerto Rico Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Juan 00936, Puerto Rico; Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77584, USA.
8
Department of Benign Hematology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
9
Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
10
Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
11
University of Alabama Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA.
12
Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Center for RNA Interference and Non-Coding RNA, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
13
Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Center for RNA Interference and Non-Coding RNA, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: asood@mdanderson.orgSummary.

Abstract

Angiogenesis inhibitors are important for cancer therapy, but clinically approved anti-angiogenic agents have shown only modest efficacy and can compromise wound healing. This necessitates the development of novel anti-angiogenesis therapies. Here, we show significantly increased EGFL6 expression in tumor versus wound or normal endothelial cells. Using a series of in vitro and in vivo studies with orthotopic and genetically engineered mouse models, we demonstrate the mechanisms by which EGFL6 stimulates tumor angiogenesis. In contrast to its antagonistic effects on tumor angiogenesis, EGFL6 blockage did not affect normal wound healing. These findings have significant implications for development of anti-angiogenesis therapies.

KEYWORDS:

chitosan nanoparticles; ovarian cancer; tumor endothelial cells; tumor vasculature; wound healing

PMID:
29212026
PMCID:
PMC5749980
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2017.11.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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