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J Cancer Res Clin Oncol. 2018 Jan;144(1):1-12. doi: 10.1007/s00432-017-2552-x. Epub 2017 Dec 5.

High-intensity exercise interventions in cancer survivors: a systematic review exploring the impact on health outcomes.

Toohey K1,2,3, Pumpa K4,5, McKune A4,5,6, Cooke J4,5, Semple S4,5,7.

Author information

1
Discipline of Sport and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, University Drive, Bruce, Canberra, ACT, 2617, Australia. kellie.toohey@canberra.edu.au.
2
Research Institute for Sport and Exercise, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia. kellie.toohey@canberra.edu.au.
3
Health Research Institute, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia. kellie.toohey@canberra.edu.au.
4
Discipline of Sport and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, University Drive, Bruce, Canberra, ACT, 2617, Australia.
5
Research Institute for Sport and Exercise, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia.
6
Discipline of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
7
Health Research Institute, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

There is an increasing body of evidence underpinning high-intensity exercise as an effective and time-efficient intervention for improving health in cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to, (1) evaluate the efficacy and (2) the safety of high-intensity exercise interventions in improving selected health outcomes in cancer survivors.

METHODS:

Design Systematic review. Data sources Google Scholar and EBSCO, CINAHL Plus, Computers and Applied Sciences Complete, Health Source-Consumer Edition, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition, MEDLINE, Web of Science and SPORTDiscuss from inception up until August 2017. Eligibility criteria Randomized controlled trials of high-intensity exercise interventions in cancer survivors (all cancer types) with health-related outcome measures. The guidelines adopted for this review were the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA).

RESULTS:

The search returned 447 articles, of which nine articles (n = 531 participants mean, age 58 ± 9.5 years) met the eligibility criteria. Exercise interventions of between 4 and 18 weeks consisting of high-intensity interval bouts of up to 4-min were compared with a continuous moderate intensity (CMIT) intervention or a control group. High-intensity exercise interventions elicited significant improvements in VO2 max, strength, body mass, body fat and hip and waist circumference compared with CMIT and/or control groups. The studies reviewed showed low risk in participating in supervised high-intensity exercise interventions. Mixed mode high-intensity interventions which included both aerobic and resistance exercises were most effective improving the aerobic fitness levels of cancer survivors by 12.45-21.35%, from baseline to post-intervention.

CONCLUSION:

High-intensity exercise interventions improved physical and physiological health-related outcome measures such as cardiovascular fitness and strength in cancer survivors. Given that high-intensity exercise sessions require a shorter time commitment, it may be a useful modality to improve health outcomes in those who are time poor. The risk of adverse events associated with high-intensity exercise was low.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Health; High-intensity exercise; Oncology; Physical activity; Safety

PMID:
29210001
DOI:
10.1007/s00432-017-2552-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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