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Elife. 2017 Dec 5;6. pii: e27041. doi: 10.7554/eLife.27041.

The Human Cell Atlas.

Author information

1
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, United States.
2
Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States.
3
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, United States.
4
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
5
EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
6
Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
7
Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States.
8
Department of Immunology, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.
9
Division of Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States.
10
Institute of Molecular Life Sciences, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
11
Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
12
Division of Genomic Technologies, RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies, Yokohama, Japan.
13
Molecular Immunity Unit, Department of Medicine, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
14
Hubrecht Institute, Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
15
Institute of Bioengineering, School of Life Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland.
16
Department of Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States.
17
Division of Theoretical Bioinformatics (B080), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
18
Department for Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics, Institute for Pharmacy and Molecular Biotechnology (IPMB) and BioQuant, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
19
Department of Biology II, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Martinsried, Germany.
20
Takara Bio United States, Inc., Mountain View, United States.
21
Oxford Centre for Neuroinflammation, Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, and MRC Human Immunology Unit, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
22
Wellcome Trust-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
23
Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, United States.
24
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.
25
Departments of Developmental Biology and of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, United States.
26
Peter Medawar Building for Pathogen Research and the Translational Gastroenterology Unit, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
27
Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, United Kingdom.
28
Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, United States.
29
Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, United States.
30
Laboratory for Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
31
Science for Life Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
32
Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, United States.
33
Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Gene Technology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
34
National Institute of Biomedical Genomics, Kalyani, India.
35
Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
36
Precision Immunology Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, United States.
37
Division of Chemical, Systems & Synthetic Biology, Institute for Infectious Disease & Molecular Medicine (IDM), Department of Integrative Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
38
Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, GRIAC Research Institute, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
39
Department of Internal Medicine and Radboud Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
40
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University, Stanford, United States.
41
Computational and Systems Biology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, New York, United States.
42
MRC Human Genetics Unit, MRC Institute of Genetics & Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
43
Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, United States.
44
Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, San Francisco, United States.
45
Epigenetics Programme, The Babraham Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
46
Centre for Trophoblast Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
47
Center for Brain Science and Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, United States.
48
Department of Biology, New York University, New York, United States.
49
New York Genome Center, New York University, New York, United States.
50
Division of Immunology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
51
Institute for Medical Engineering & Science (IMES) and Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States.
52
Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, United States.
53
Department of Computer Science and Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel.
54
Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, Department of Immunology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, United States.
55
Institute of Computational Biology, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Center Munich, Neuherberg, Germany.
56
Department of Mathematics, Technical University of Munich, Garching, Germany.
57
Science for Life Laboratory and Department of Proteomics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
58
Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Danish Technical University, Lyngby, Denmark.
59
Hubrecht Institute and University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
60
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Center for Computational Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, United States.
61
Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
62
Department of Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, United States.
63
California Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, United States.
64
Center for RNA Systems Biology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, United States.
65
Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, United States.
66
Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, United States.
67
Gastrointestinal Unit and Center for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, United States.
68
Center for Microbiome Informatics and Therapeutics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, United States.

Abstract

The recent advent of methods for high-throughput single-cell molecular profiling has catalyzed a growing sense in the scientific community that the time is ripe to complete the 150-year-old effort to identify all cell types in the human body. The Human Cell Atlas Project is an international collaborative effort that aims to define all human cell types in terms of distinctive molecular profiles (such as gene expression profiles) and to connect this information with classical cellular descriptions (such as location and morphology). An open comprehensive reference map of the molecular state of cells in healthy human tissues would propel the systematic study of physiological states, developmental trajectories, regulatory circuitry and interactions of cells, and also provide a framework for understanding cellular dysregulation in human disease. Here we describe the idea, its potential utility, early proofs-of-concept, and some design considerations for the Human Cell Atlas, including a commitment to open data, code, and community.

KEYWORDS:

cell atlas; cell biology; computational biology; human; lineage; mouse; science forum; single-cell genomics; systems biology

PMID:
29206104
PMCID:
PMC5762154
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.27041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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