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Eur J Pediatr. 2018 Feb;177(2):211-219. doi: 10.1007/s00431-017-3054-1. Epub 2017 Dec 4.

Fixed versus variable practice for teaching medical students the management of pediatric asthma exacerbations using simulation.

Author information

1
Ilumens Simulation Department, Paris Descartes University, 45 rue des Saint Pères, 75006, Paris, France. david.drummond@ilumens.org.
2
Pediatric Pulmonology, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, AP-HP, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75015, Paris, France. david.drummond@ilumens.org.
3
Ilumens Simulation Department, Paris Descartes University, 45 rue des Saint Pères, 75006, Paris, France.
4
Emergency Department, Lariboisiere Hospital, AP-HP, 2, Rue Ambroise Paré, Paris, France.
5
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Beaujon, AP-HP, Clichy and Paris Diderot University, Paris, France.
6
Risks in Pregnancy, Universitary Hospital Departement, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France.
7
Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Cochin Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, AP-HP, Paris, France.
8
Pediatric Pulmonology, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, AP-HP, 149 rue de Sèvres, 75015, Paris, France.

Abstract

Simulation-based trainings represent an interesting approach to teach medical students the management of pediatric asthma exacerbations (PAEs). In this study, we compared two pedagogical approaches, training students once on three different scenarios of PAEs versus training students three times on the same scenario of PAE. Eighty-five third-year medical students, novice learners for the management of PAEs, were randomized and trained. Students were assessed twice, 1 week and 4 months after the training, on a scenario of PAE new to both groups and on scenarios used during the training. The main outcome was the performance score on the new scenario of PAE at 1 week, assessed on a checklist custom-designed for the study. All students progressed rapidly and acquired excellent skills. One week after the training, there was no difference between the two groups on all the scenarios tested, including the new scenario of PAE (median performance score (IQR) of 8.3 (7.4-10.0) in the variation group versus 8.0 (6.0-10.0) in the repetition group (p = 0.16)). Four months later, the performance of the two groups remained similar.

CONCLUSION:

Varying practice with different scenarios was equivalent to repetitive practice on the same scenario for novice learners, with both methods leading to transfer and long-term retention of the skills acquired during the training. What is known: • Simulation-based trainings represent an interesting approach to teach medical students the management of pediatric asthma exacerbations. • It is unclear whether students would benefit more from repetitive practice on the same scenario of asthma exacerbation or from practice on different scenarios in terms of transfer of skills. What is new: • An individual 30-min training on the management of pediatric asthma exacerbations using simulation allows transfer and long-term retention of the skills acquired. • Varying practice with different scenarios is equivalent to repetitive practice on the same scenario in terms of transfer of skills.

KEYWORDS:

Asthma exacerbation; Medical education; Simulation training; Variability of practice

PMID:
29204851
DOI:
10.1007/s00431-017-3054-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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