Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2017 Dec 20;60(12):3632-3641. doi: 10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0119.

Receptive Vocabulary, Cognitive Flexibility, and Inhibitory Control Differentially Predict Older and Younger Adults' Success Perceiving Speech by Talkers With Dysarthria.

Author information

1
School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee.
2
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL.

Abstract

Purpose:

Previous research has demonstrated equivocal findings related to the effect of listener age on intelligibility ratings of dysarthric speech. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that support younger and older adults' perception of speech by talkers with dysarthria.

Method:

Younger and older adults identified words in phrases produced by talkers with dysarthria. Listeners also completed assessments on peripheral hearing, receptive vocabulary, and executive control functions.

Results:

Older and younger adults did not differ in their ability to perceive speech by talkers with dysarthria. Younger adults' success in identifying words produced by talkers with dysarthria was associated only with their hearing acuity. In contrast, older adults showed effects of working memory and cognitive flexibility and interactions between hearing acuity and receptive vocabulary and between hearing acuity and inhibitory control.

Conclusions:

Although older and younger adults had equivalent performance identifying words produced by talkers with dysarthria, older adults appear to utilize more cognitive support to identify those words.

PMID:
29204601
DOI:
10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0119
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center