Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Therap Adv Gastroenterol. 2017 Dec;10(12):919-929. doi: 10.1177/1756283X17734116. Epub 2017 Oct 16.

Use of beta-blockers and risk of serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a population-based case-control study.

Author information

1
Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark The Research Unit of General Practice, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
2
Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
3
Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark.
4
Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, J. B. Winsløws Vej 19, 2, 5000 Odense C, Denmark.

Abstract

Background:

Some studies indicate a reduced risk of serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) for users of beta-blockers, but the association remains to be confirmed in larger studies and characterized with respect to differences among beta-blockers. We aimed to assess whether beta-blocker use decreases the risk of UGIB.

Methods:

We conducted a register-based, population-based case-control study in Denmark. We identified cases with a first validated discharge diagnosis of UGIB during the period 1995-2006. Controls were selected by risk-set sampling in a ratio of 10:1. We estimated crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of the association between current beta-blocker use and the risk of UGIB by using conditional logistic regression and further stratified by selective and non-selective beta-blockers, respectively.

Results:

We identified 3571 UGIB cases and 35,582 controls. Use of beta-blockers was not found to be associated with a decreased risk of UGIB (adjusted OR 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00-1.21). The association remained neutral after stratification by selective and non-selective beta-blockers, and by single beta-blocker substances. Similarly, we found no association between current beta-blocker use and the risk of UGIB within different subgroups.

Conclusions:

We found no association between beta-blocker use and UGIB.

KEYWORDS:

beta-blocker use; non-variceal; pharmaco-epidemiology; population-based; upper gastrointestinal bleeding

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of interest statement: Dr Reilev, Dr Rishøj, Dr Arnspang, Dr Pottegård, Dr Broe, Dr Damkier, M. Olesen, M. Ernst, Dr Dastrup, Dr Rasmussen and Dr Hansen have nothing to disclose. Dr Hellfritzsch has received speaker honoraria from Pfeizer and Bristol-Myers Squibb, outside the submitted work. Dr Hallas reports grants from Pfizer, grants from Takeda and grants from Merini, outside the submitted work.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center